How to do an autoresponder without having to buy a service like MailChimp or Constant Contact

By |2018-08-30T15:04:50+00:00June 6th, 2018|Categories: Knowledge-base, Tips & Tricks|

Check out the video below for a step-by-step how to create an autoresponder without having to pay someone for it. Or if you're coming here from YouTube, scroll down further to get the free autoresponder code. Thanks and take care! Want the Sample Autoresponder code? Fill out the form below and it will be mailed to you ASAP! Have a good one! Wendy

How to Prepare for a Small Business Website Redesign

By |2018-08-30T15:04:51+00:00January 22nd, 2018|Categories: Knowledge-base, Tips & Tricks|Tags: , , , , |

So you’ve been saddled with trying to get your company’s website redesigned. Can be a bit overwhelming, right? How do you know what you’re supposed to know without having to become an expert yourself? How can you be sure you’re not going to be taken advantage of? What features are crucial and which ones are nice-to-haves? Okay, take a deep breath. There is a lot to cover, but it’s really no where near as bad as it could be. […]

How to Create, Update or Change My WordPress Site’s Menu

By |2018-08-30T15:04:51+00:00November 2nd, 2017|Categories: Support, Tips & Tricks|Tags: |

How to Create WordPress Menus To access the WordPress menu so you can either create a new menu or make changes to an existing menu, go to your WordPress Admin area, scroll down the left hand menu until you come to Appearance. Hover over the menu and then click on Menus from the pop out. Alternatively, if you're logged into WordPress and over on the live site, you can go and hover over your site name in the black Admin bar at the top, then drop down to Menus from there.   When you first access the Menus page, it will look something like this: To start, you'll want to give your menu structure a name. Typically I tend to name them with where I want them to be displayed just for easy reference. For example, I named this one "Top Navigation" because I'm working on the menu that I want to appear across the top of my site. Note however that simply naming it this will not make it appear where I want it to - I have to assign this menu to that location. To do that, I have to check the "Top Menu" box you see below. [...]

Moving Your WordPress Site to a New Directory and All Your Images and Inline Links are Broken?

By |2018-08-30T15:05:09+00:00June 18th, 2017|Categories: Knowledge-base, Tips & Tricks|Tags: , , |

Oh this is a fun one because we struggled with this issue for ages. What we’re talking about is when you have your WordPress directory in say www.domain.com/dev and you are moving it via FTP to just www.domain.com/ – the root or main folder of your website. When you transfer all the files and follow the WordPress guidelines for moving your site, the database will still have many images and in line links (any links you setup within the posts or pages editors) that still point to www.domain.com/dev in its database. Even though you changed it on the “General Settings” tab in your dashboard. So how do I fix it? The high level way to repair this issue is to jump into phpMyAdmin and run queries on your database to make your adjustments; backing up your database first of course. But if you’re not a developer, this is simply just not an option. So what do you do? […]

When you have to tell a client “no”

By |2018-08-30T15:05:09+00:00October 11th, 2016|Categories: General, Tips & Tricks|

Clients are humans too. There. I said it. We all know it’s true but sometimes when they ask us to do the impossible and devolve into demanding demons… or really-scary-deadline-demanding-jerks-who-don’t-realize-you-are-not-a-robot. In light of this, I would ask you to remember something. Ladies and gentlemen… please remember you can push back. If a client wants a deadline that’s unreasonable, for heaven’s sake just SAY so. Don’t destroy yourself with an all-nighter, or give up on what you had already planned! That will make your life miserable and eventually it’ll breed resentment. Truth be told, the client has no idea why one graphic may take 10 minutes but another takes you 10 hours. Saying a **version** of “no” to a client almost never means you’ve lost that client for good, but designers are afraid to put that foot down. If you can save the client every now and again with an 11-hour Hail-Mary pass then that’s awesome, but even when you pull that off you need to be clear that you can’t do that every time – but you’ll happily accept their praise for rockin’ it this time. 🙂 […]